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    Sen. Cory Booker (D-N.J.), (Photo ©2018 Douglas Christian)

    WASHINGTON — In defiance of Senate rules and fully aware of the potential consequences, Sen. Cory Booker on Thursday released 15-pages of confidential emails related to Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh’s views on the use of racial profiling.

    “I understand the penalty comes with potential ousting from the Senate … I openly invite and accept the consequences of my team releasing that email right now,” Booker (D-N.J.) told the Senate Judiciary Committee prior to the release.

    The emails are from Kavanaugh’s tenure in the administration of President George W. Bush.

    Kavanaugh served as associate White House counsel from 2001-03 and served as White House staff secretary from 2003-06.

    The National Archives has furnished documents related to Kavanaugh’s tenure in the White House Counsel’s Office to the Senate Judiciary Committee under the condition the documents are not shared outside the committee. That condition was imposed by lawyers for former President George W. Bush.

    The National Archives has not agreed to furnish documents related to Kavanaugh’s tenure as staff secretary.

    Democrats have argued the denial of access suggests Republicans are trying to conceal Kavanaugh’s past.

    On Tuesday, the first day of Kavanaugh’s confirmation hearing, Democrats moved to adjourn in order to have more time to review 42,000 pages of documents the committee received the previous evening.

    Chairman Chuck Grassley (R-Iowa) rejected the request as well as superseding requests to adjourn.

    Following Thursday’s document release, reports emerged that said the Bush library agreed to make the emails public. If the reports are true, Booker did not violate Senate rules.

    WASHINGTON — Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer said Thursday that his Democratic colleagues filed a Freedom of Information Act request for documents related to Judge Brett Kavanaugh’s tenure as White House staff secretary during the administration of President George W. Bush.

    “Because Republicans have chosen obfuscation over transparency, Democrats on the Judiciary Committee led by Senator [Richard] Blumenthal (D-Conn.) issued a FOIA request to the National Archives seeking the full gamet of Kavanaugh’s records, including his time as staff secretary,” Schumer said at a news conference in which he was accompanied by Blumenthal and Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse (D-R.I.).

    Blumenthal, who served as Connecticut attorney general for 20 years prior to joining the Senate, told reporters he is willing to argue the case in court if the National Archives does not provide the documents by the Aug. 28 deadline. The request was filed last week while Congress was on recess.

    President Donald Trump nominated Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court on July 9. Kavanaugh, 53, sits on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia.

    Kavanaugh served as associate White House counsel from 2001-03 and served as White House staff secretary from 2003-06.

    The National Archives has furnished documents related to Kavanaugh’s tenure in the White House Counsel’s Office to the Senate Judiciary Committee under the condition that the documents are not shared outside the committee. Lawyers for the Bush presidential library made that a precondition for access.

    The National Archives has not agreed to furnish documents related to Kavanugh’s tenure as staff secretary.

    Democrats argue the denial of access suggests Republicans are trying to conceal Kavanugh’s past.

    Republicans counter that the more than 100,000 pages of documents already provided is more than sufficient.

    Kavanaugh’s confirmation hearing is scheduled to begin on Sept. 4 and will last three to four days, Senate Judiciary Chairman Chuck Grassley (R-Iowa) announced last week.

    WASHINGTON – Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer expressed frustration upon learning that some of the documents related to Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh’s tenure in the administration of President George W. Bush may not be released until October.

    “Today, the National Archives confirmed our worst fear – that the vast majority of even the small portion of records the American public will see from Brett Kavanaugh’s time in the Bush White House will be pre-screened by a political operative and attorney for George W. Bush, Steve Bannon, Reince Priebus, and Donald McGahn,” Schumer (D-N.Y.) said in a statement on Thursday.

    Schumer added: “This unprecedented process appears to be designed intentionally by Republicans to deny the Senate and the American people the information they need to evaluate this critically important nomination.”

    President Donald Trump nominated Judge Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court last month. Kavanaugh, 53, sits on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia.

    He served as associate White House counsel from 2001-03 and  served as White House staff secretary from 2003-06. The staff secretary is responsible for circulating documents between the president and senior White House aides.

    Schumer and many other Democrats have said they will oppose Kavanaugh’s confirmation.

    Democrats have sought to delay confirmation by asking for troves of documents. Republicans agreed to some of the requests but dismissed others as stall tactics.

    The National Archives on Thursday agreed to furnish documents related to Kavanaugh’s tenure in the White House Counsel’s Office but not documents related to his tenure as staff secretary.

    Schumer said Republicans have blocked access to those documents.

    Senate Judiciary Chairman Chuck Grassley (R-Iowa) told reporters earlier Thursday that Republicans have made a good- faith effort to cooperate with Democratic requests but went on to say that the volume of requests has become excessive.

    When asked when Kavanaugh’s confirmation hearing might take place, Grassley said: “Sometime during September.”

    The nominee faces an uphill battle.

    Republicans occupy 51 seats. Democrats occupy 49 seats. Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz) is battling brain cancer and has been absent since December.

    House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) at her weekly press conference, March 15, 2018, (Photo ©2018 Douglas Christian)

    WASHINGTON- House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi urged Democrats upset about the confirmation of Judge Brett Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court to channel that anger at the ballot box next month.

    “We must not agonize, we must organize. People must vote. What is at stake in this election is nothing less than the health and financial security of families across America,” Pelosi (D-Calif.) said in a statement on Sunday. “The new conservative majority on the Supreme Court threatens a rollback of protections for people with pre-existing conditions, more leverage for corporate special interests over working families, and little hope to reform Citizens United.”

    In 2010 the Supreme Court ruled in Citizens United v Federal Election Commission (FEC) that the First Amendment prohibits the government from placing restrictions on the amount of money corporations, unions, and non-profit organizations use for political activities so long as the activities are not coordinated by a party or candidate. Critics of the decision say it has given special interest groups more power over the political process.

    Pelosi went to say she will file a Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) request for FBI documents related to the investigation into allegations of sexual misconduct against Kavanaugh.

    Democrats argue that the FBI report provided to the Senate Judiciary Committee last week was incomplete and that the White House hindered the Bureau’s investigation.

    The Senate confirmed Kavanaugh on Saturday. Chief Justice John Roberts officially swore in Kavanaugh a short time after the vote. President Donald Trump will swear in Kavanaugh Monday evening in a ceremonial event at the White House.

    Kavanaugh has denied the allegations.

    Anti-Kavanaugh protests rocked Capitol Hill throughout the confirmation process.

    Demonstrators interrupted hearings, blocked hallways, and participated in sit-ins in members’ offices.

    Hundreds were arrested and charged with disorderly conduct.

    Polls suggest Democrats are in a good position to win the 23 seats needed to retake the House.

    Polls suggest Democrats are unlikely to retake the Senate as many are up for re-election this year in states Trump won by double-digits.

    WASHINGTON – The Senate late-Saturday afternoon confirmed Judge Brett M. Kavanaugh to the United States Supreme Court.

    The nomination was approved 50-48.

    Alaska GOP Sen. Lisa Murkowski voted “present” so that Sen. Steve Daines (R-Mont.) could remain in Montana for his daughter’s wedding.

    West Virginia Sen. Joe Manchin is the only Democrat who voted to confirm Kavanaugh.

    Saturday’s vote marks the end of what many believe to be the most contentious confirmation process for a nominee to the high court in modern history.

    Allegations of sexual misconduct against Kavanaugh surfaced in mid-September and threatened to derail the nomination.

    Last week California psychology professor Christine Blasey Ford told the Senate Judiciary Committee she is “100 percent sure” Kavanaugh sexually assaulted her at a high school party in the early 1980s.

    Kavanaugh denied the allegation in his testimony to the committee.

    The day after the hearing, the committee voted to approve Kavanaugh but a agreement was reached at the request of Sen. Jeff Flake (R-Ariz.) to delay the floor vote for one week so the FBI could investigate Ford’s allegations, as well as those of Deborah Ramirez. She accused Kavanaugh of exposing himself to her at a party while they were freshmen at Yale.

    A supplemental report on the investigation was sent to Capitol Hill on Thursday.

    Members were invited to view the report in a secure room for up to one hour. Only one copy was made available to the 100 senators.

    Republicans said the report exonerated Kavanaugh of any wrongdoing.

    Democrats criticized the report as incomplete and called for some of the documents to be released with redactions.

    The request was denied.

    President Donald Trump nominated Kavanaugh to the high court on July 9 to replace retiring Associate Justice Anthony Kennedy.

    Kavanaugh, 53, sits on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia. President George W. Bush nominated Kavanaugh to that position in 2006.

    Kavanaugh served as associate White House counsel from 2001-03 and served as White House staff secretary from 2003-06.

    Democrats accused Republicans of trying to conceal documents related to Kavanaugh’s tenure as staff secretary.

    Republicans countered that the more than 400,000 pages of documents they provided were more than sufficient.

    Anti-Kavanaugh protests rocked Capitol Hill throughout the confirmation process.

    Demonstrators interrupted hearings, blocked hallways, and participated in sit-ins in members’ offices.

    Hundreds were arrested and charged with disorderly conduct.

    Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer urged those angry about Kavanaugh to express that anger at the ballot box next month.

    “Our country needs to have a reckoning on these issues, and there is only one remedy. Change must come from where change in America always begins: the ballot box,” Schumer (D-N.Y.) said in a floor speech prior to the vote.

    He added: “So to Americans, to so many millions who are outraged by what happened here, there’s one answer: Vote.”

    Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell praised Republicans for having held firm in the face of protests.

    “We were not intimidated by the mob,” McConnell (R-Ky.) said at a news conference following the vote.

    McConnell went on to say tensions will cool.

    “These things blow over,” he said.

    President Trump said Kavanaugh will be sworn-in this evening.

    WASHINGTON – The Senate Friday voted to end debate on the nomination of President Donald Trump’s Supreme Court pick, Judge Brett Kavanaugh.

    The cloture motion passed 51-49.

    Senate rules allow up to 30 hours of debate after cloture is invoked.

    A final vote is expected late Saturday afternoon.

    GOP Sens. Susan Collins of Maine, Lisa Murkowski of Alaska and Jeff Flake of Arizona have not yet said how they will vote. Neither has West Virginia Democratic Sen. Joe Manchin.

    Collins, Flake and Manchin voted for the cloture motion. Murkowski did not.

    Collins has said she will announce her decision at 3 p.m. EDT.

    Allegations of sexual misconduct against Kavanaugh have been the focus of the confirmation process since mid-September.

    Last week California psychology professor Christine Blasey Ford told the Senate Judiciary Committee she is “100 percent sure” Kavanaugh sexually assaulted her at a high school party in the early 1980s.

    Kavanaugh denied the allegation in his testimony to the committee.

    The day after the hearing, the committee voted to approve Kavanaugh but a agreement was reached to delay the floor vote for one week so the FBI could investigate Ford’s allegations, as well as those of Deborah Ramirez. She accused Kavanaugh of exposing himself to her at a party while they were freshmen at Yale.

    A supplemental report on the investigation was sent to Capitol Hill Thursday morning.

    Members were invited to view the report in a secure room for up to one hour. Only one copy was made available to the 100 senators.

    Shortly thereafter Chairman Chuck Grassley (R-Iowa) said in a statement that the report exonerates Kavanaugh of any wrongdoing.

    Senate Democrats criticized the report as incomplete and called for some of the documents to be released with redactions.

    The request was denied.

    At present count Kavanaugh has the support of 48 of 51 Senate Republicans. If all 49 Senate Democrats vote no, Kavanaugh will need two more Republicans to vote yes. That would enable Vice President Mike Pence to enter the fray and cast the tie-breaking vote.

    Immediately after the cloture motion, President Donald Trump tweeted: “Very proud of the U.S. Senate for voting “YES” to advance the nomination of Judge Brett Kavanaugh!”

    WASHINGTON – More than half of likely U.S. voters disapprove of the Senate’s handling of the confirmation process of Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh and believe investigations into his background have been excessive, according to a poll released Friday.

    The Rasmussen Reports survey found that 54 percent of the respondents said senators now have sufficient information to make an informed decision on whether to support Kavanaugh, compared with 33 percent who said senators need more information before they vote. Meanwhile, 13 percent said they are not sure if senators have sufficient information to make an informed decision on the nominee.

    The sampling included 1,000 likely voters and was carried out Oct. 1-2. The poll has a margin of error of plus or minus 3 percentage points.

    The release of the survey comes less than two hours before the Senate is expected to vote on a motion to end debate on the nomination.

    Allegations of sexual misconduct against Kavanaugh became the focus of the confirmation process at the eleventh hour.

    Last week California psychology professor Christine Blasey Ford told the Senate Judiciary Committee she is “100 percent sure” Kavanaugh sexually assaulted her at a high school party in the early 1980s.

    Kavanaugh denied the allegation in his testimony to the committee.

    The day after the hearing, the committee voted to approve Kavanaugh but a agreement was reached to delay the floor vote for one week so the FBI could investigate Ford’s allegations, as well as those of Deborah Ramirez. She accused Kavanaugh of exposing himself to her at a party while they were freshmen at Yale.

    A supplemental report on the investigation was sent to Capitol Hill Thursday morning.

    Members were invited to view the report in a secure room for up to one hour. Only one copy was made available to the 100 senators.

    Shortly thereafter Chairman Chuck Grassley (R-Iowa) said in a statement that the report exonerates Kavanaugh of any wrongdoing.

    Senate Democrats criticized the report as incomplete and called for some of the documents to be released with redactions.

    The request was denied.

    WASHINGTON – Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Chuck Grassley said he hopes Supreme nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh is confirmed on Saturday.

    “Hopefully we’re 48 hours away from having a new person on the Supreme Court,” Grassley (R-Iowa) said at a news conference on Thursday where he was accompanied by fellow Judiciary Committee Republicans who eschewed similar sentiments.

    “We need to confirm him right away,” Sen. Orrin Hatch of Utah said.

    Hatch added: “His confirmation will be a victory for the Senate as an institution [and] a reminder that the politics of baseless personal destruction has no place here.”

    Early Thursday morning the committee received a supplemental FBI report into allegations of sexual misconduct against Kavanaugh.

    Shortly thereafter Grassley said in a statement that the report exonerates Kavanaugh of any wrongdoing.

    Members were invited to view the report in a secure room for up to one hour. Only one copy was made available to the 100 senators.

    Senate Democrats criticized the report as incomplete and called for some of the documents to be released with redactions.

    The request was denied.

    Kavanaugh was approved by the committee last week but an agreement was reached to delay the floor vote for one week so the FBI could investigate the allegations.

    Kavanaugh has denied allegations of sexual misconduct.

    Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) filed a motion late Wednesday night to end debate on the nomination.

    Under Senate rules, once a cloture petition is filed an intervening day is required for the petition to ripen. Once the petition ripens the Senate may vote on a motion to invoke cloture one hour after the Senate convenes. Once the motion is adopted, 30 hours of debate are allowed. Once debate time has expired a final vote may take place.

    A procedural vote is expected Friday morning and a final vote is expected as early as Saturday afternoon.

    At present count Kavanaugh has the support of 48 of 51 Senate Republicans. If all 49 Senate Democrats vote no, Kavanaugh will need two more Republicans to vote yes. That would enable Vice President Mike Pence to enter the fray and cast the tie-breaking vote.

    WASHINGTON – Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer said Thursday that he disagrees with a claim by Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Chuck Grassley that the supplemental FBI report into allegations of sexual misconduct against Judge Brett Kavanaugh exonerates the Supreme Court nominee of any wrongdoing.

    “Having received a briefing on all of the documents, I disagree with Senator Grassley’s statement that there was no hint of misconduct,” Schumer (D-N.Y.) said at a news conference.

    Schumer went on say he believed the scope of the investigation was limited and reiterated his request that ” the documents with proper redaction be made public.”

    Schumer was accompanied by Sen. Dianne Feinstein of California, who is the top Democrat on the Judiciary Committee.

    Feinstein said: “The most notable part of this report is what’s not in it.”

    She added: “As was noted by the White House, the FBI did not interview Brett Kavanaugh. Nor did the FBI interview Dr. [Christine] Blasey Ford.”

    Ford told the committee last Thursday that she is “100 percent sure” Kavanaugh sexually assaulted her at a high school party in the early 1980s.

    Kavanaugh vehemently denied the allegation in his testimony to the committee.

    Copies of the FBI report were sent to both the White House and Capitol Hill early Thursday morning.

    Grassley (R-Iowa) said members can view the report in a secure room for up to one hour. Only one copy is available to the 100 senators, Schumer noted.

    Kavanaugh was approved by the committee last week but an agreement was reached to delay the floor vote for one week so the FBI could investigate the allegations.

    Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) filed a motion late-Wednesday evening to end debate on the nomination.

    Under Senate rules, once a cloture petition is filed an intervening day is required for the petition to ripen. Once the petition ripens the Senate may vote on a motion to invoke cloture one hour after the Senate convenes. Once the motion is adopted, 30 hours of debate are allowed. Once debate time has expired a final vote may take place.

    A procedural vote is expected Friday morning and a final vote is expected as early as Saturday afternoon.

    At present count Kavanaugh has the support of 48 of 51 Senate Republicans. If all 49 Senate Democrats vote no, Kavanaugh will need two more Republicans to vote yes. That would enable Vice President Mike Pence to enter the fray and cast the tie-breaking vote.

    Sen. Susan Collins (R-Me.), whose support is considered crucial, told reporters Thursday she believes the FBI report was “very thorough.”

    Sen. Jeff Flake (R-Ariz.), who last week joined Democrats in requesting the FBI investigation, said he agrees with Collins.

    “I think Susan Collins was quoted saying it was very thorough but no new corroborative information came out of it. That’s accurate,” Flake told reporters.

    Kavanaugh has denied allegations of sexual misconduct.

    WASHINGTON — A White House spokesperson said Thursday that the West Wing is “totally confident” that Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh will be confirmed now that the FBI has issued its report.

    “This is the last addition to the most comprehensive review of a Supreme Court nominee in history, which includes extensive hearings, multiple committee interviews, over 1,200 questions for the record and over a half million pages of documents,” said Raj Shah, who has been spearheading the administration’s communications strategy on Kavanaugh.

    Kavanaugh’s confirmation process was delayed on Friday after Sen. Jeff Flake (R-Ariz.), a potential swing vote, pressed for an FBI investigation into sexual assault allegations against the nominee prior to a final vote.

    Kavanaugh has denied all allegations of sexually inappropriate behavior.

    The FBI’s report was provided to the Senate early this morning, but is not expected to be formally released to the public.

    The confirmation process moved Wednesday night after Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) filed a motion to end debate on the nominee, setting up a procedural vote Friday followed by a final on Saturday.

    Senate Democrats are expected to address the report late Thursday morning.

    They will likely air concerns with the FBI’s investigation, which did not include an interview with California-based professor Christine Blasey Ford, who testified last Thursday that Kavanaugh assaulted her when they were both teens. Kavanaugh also testified before the Senate Judiciary Committee on the same day, and vehemently denied Ford’s allegation.

    The FBI reportedly did interview Deborah Ramirez, who said Kavanaugh exposed himself to her during a party at Yale.