Marijuana legalization, death penalty, gun control on state ballots

Marijuana legalization, death penalty, gun control on state ballots

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Marijuana legalization, the status of the death penalty, and gun control proposals will be considered by voters in about a dozen states on Nov. 8.

WASHINGTON – Marijuana legalization, the status of the death penalty, and gun control proposals will be among the most contentious issues considered by voters in about a dozen states on Nov. 8.

MARIJUANA

Marijuana is legal for recreational purposes in Colorado, Washington, Oregon, Alaska and the District of Columbia. On Nov. 8 voters in California, Florida, Massachusetts, Arizona, Maine, Nevada, Montana and North Dakota will have a chance to decide whether their respective states wish to join those five jurisdictions in legalizing marijuana altogether or only under specific circumstances.

California: Proposition 64 would permit adults 21 and over to use recreational marijuana. A recent USC Dornsife/Los Angeles Times poll released on Nov. 2 said 58 percent of Golden State voters favor the initiative compared with 37 percent who said they did not.

Florida: Amendment 2 would legalize medical marijuana use for those suffering from certain health conditions. A recent St. Leo University poll released at the end of October said 71.3 percent of Sunshine State voters support the amendment compared with 21.6 who said they did not.

Maine: Question 4 if passed would legalize recreational marijuana use for adults. A recent Suffolk University/Boston Globe poll released on Oct. 27 showed that 48.8 percent of Bay State voters support passage compared with 42.4 percent who said they did not.

Arizona: Proposition 205 would legalize recreational marijuana use and possession for adults 21 and over. An Arizona Republic/Morrison and Cronkite News poll taken in mid-October said 50.4 percent of Grand Canyon State voters favor the initiative while 41.6 percent said they did not.

Maine: Question 1 if passed would legalize recreational marijuana use for adults 21 and over. A Portland Press Herald Poll released at the end of October found that 50 percent of Pine Tree State voters favor passage compared with 41 percent who said they did not.

Nevada: Question 2 if passed would legalize recreational marijuana use not exceeding one ounce for adults 21 and over. A Bendixen/Amandi International poll released at the end of October said 47 percent of Silver State voters favor passage; 43 percent said they did not.

Arkansas: Issue 6 if adopted would legalize medical marijuana use for those suffering from specific health conditions. A recent survey carried out by The Arkansas Poll toward the end of October found that 50 percent of Natural State voters support adoption compared with 43 percent who said they did not.

Montana: Initiative 182 if adopted would repeal an existing state statute prohibiting authorized distributors from prescribing medical marijuana to more than three patients. A survey carried out by Mason-Dixon Polling and Research in early October said 51 percent of Treasure State voters oppose the initiative compared with 44 percent who said they support it.

North Dakota: Initiated Statutory Measure 5 if adopted would legalize medical marijuana use for those suffering from deadly diseases and other serious health conditions. Polls gauging support for this initiative are currently unavailable.

DEATH PENALTY

Capital punishment has effectively been nullified in 19 states and the District of Columbia. On Nov. 8 voters in California, Nebraska and Oklahoma will weigh in as to whether they too wish to either repeal the death penalty or, as in the case of Nebraska, reinstate it.

California: Proposition 62 would effectively repeal the state’s death penalty statute. A SurveyUSA poll carried out in early October contended that 53 percent of Golden State voters opposed the initiative compared with 35 percent who said they supported it.

Nebraska: Referendum 426 would reinstate capital punishment in the state. An August Global Marketing Research Services survey said 58.3 percent of Cornhusker State voters support reinstating capital punishment compared with 30.3 percent who said they did not.

Oklahoma: Question 776 would insert a provision into the Oklahoma constitution granting state officials complete autonomy over administering capital punishment. A July Sooner Poll survey contended that 47.6 percent of Sooner State voters support passage; 24.4 percent said they did not.

GUN CONTROL

Voters in Maine, California, Washington and Nevada will consider gun control initiatives on Nov. 8.

Maine: Question 3 would mandate criminal background checks regarding the transfer of firearms among non-licensed distributors. A University of New Hampshire Survey Center poll carried out at the end of October said 52 percent of Pine Tree State voters support passage compared with 43 percent who said they did not.

California: Proposition 63 would mandate background checks for those who wish to buy ammunition and also make it illegal to possesses certain high-capacity magazines. A USC Dornsife/Los Angeles Times poll carried out at the end of October contended that 58 percent of Golden State voters support adoption compared with 35 percent who said they did not.

Washington: Initiative 1491 would allow Washington courts to issue protection orders essentially banning individuals believed to be dangerous from purchasing or obtaining firearms. An Elway Poll survey carried out at the end of October said 67 percent of Evergreen State voters support adoption compared with 18 percent who said they did not.

Nevada: Question 1 would mandate that gun transfers be administered by an authorized dealer but would also allow for specific exemptions. A Bendixen & Amandi International poll carried out at the end of October said 54 percent of Silver State voters support the proposal; 38 percent who said they did not.

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  • 1 COMMENT

    1. I’ve served as an elected District Attorney in Conservative Texas. Every DA is on a limited budget. We have to make choices. I believe in strict punishment for violent offenders and burglars. I rarely gave probation. Unfortunately we had to deal with all these annoying pot cases. Even when pot users got probation the understaffed probation officers had to make sure they were in by 10PM – I’d rather they checked on sex offenders.]
      Revenues are another reason to legalize. The Washington Post reports for 2015 Colorado gained 18,000 pot-related jobs and $2.4 billion in revenue. 2016 will be much better.

      Use among teens has not increased both according to surveys from the Denver Post and Federal Government.

      Its best to vote “Yes”.

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