Poll split as Alabama special election looms

Poll split as Alabama special election looms

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Roy Moore, Republican candidate for the Senate from Alabama
Roy Moore, Republican candidate for the Senate from Alabama

WASHINGTON — Polls released on the eve of Alabama’s special election are telling two very different stories.

Republican Senatorial candidate Roy Moore leads Democratic challenger Doug Jones by nine points, according to a new Emerson College poll released on the eve of Alabama’s special election.

Moore, who has denied multiple accusations of sexual misconduct ranging from pursuing relationships with teenagers to sexual assault, leads with 53 percent vs. 44 percent for Jones.

The nine-point lead iin the poll represents a significant jump from a similar Emerson College poll released last week, which had Jones trailing by 3 percent.

A Fox News poll, however, shows Jones leading Moore by a 10 percent margin.

Jones captures 50 percent while Moore trails at 40 percent, a 2 percent dip for Moore, who trailed Jones 50-42 percent in a similar poll conducted in mid-November.

The polls come after Moore has received institutional support from the Republican Party, including financial assistance from the Republican National Committee and a full-throated endorsement from President Donald Trump, which included a rally near the Alabama border in Pensacola, Fla. on Friday night.

Moore has still not received the full backing from all facets of the Republican establishment.

The National Republican Senate Committee’s chair, Sen. Cory Gardner (R-Colo.), has declined to support Moore and has forcefully ruled out any last-minute assistance.

In addition, Sen. Richard Shelby (R-Ala.) told CNN on Sunday that he did not vote for Moore and instead wrote in a different candidate.

“I do believe the Republicans can do better,” Shelby said.

The Emerson poll was conducted among 600 “very likely” Alabama voters between Dec. 7-9. There is a margin of error of +/- 3.9 percentage points.

The Fox News poll was conducted among 1,127 likely voters between Dec. 7-10. There is a margin of error of +/- 2.5 percentage points.

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