Navy finds remains of second sailor aboard flooded USS John S. McCain

Navy finds remains of second sailor aboard flooded USS John S. McCain

By Loree Lewis   
Published
The guided-missile destroyer USS John S. McCain arrives pier side at Changi Naval Base, Republic of Singapore on Aug. 21 following a collision with the merchant vessel Alnic MC while underway east of the Straits of Malacca and Singapore. (Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Joshua Fulton/ U.S. Navy)

WASHINGTON – U.S. Navy and Marine Corps divers recovered and identified the remains of a second sailor missing from the USS John S. McCain after it collided with a Liberian-flagged oil tanker Sunday east of Singapore.

Electronics Technician 3rd Class Dustin Louis Doyon, 26, from Suffield, Connecticut. (Photo: U.S. Navy)

The remains, discovered Thursday, were identified as as Electronics Technician 3rd Class Dustin Louis Doyon, 26, from Suffield, Connecticut.

“More divers and equipment arrived overnight to continue search and recovery operations for eight missing Sailors inside flooded compartments of the ship,” the Navy said in a Friday statement.

The Navy called off search and rescue efforts Thursday, after a multinational effort that lasted 80 hours and spanned an about 2,100-square mile area.

Divers searching in flooded compartments of the damaged guided-missile destroyer earlier recovered the remains of one sailor, Electronics Technician 3rd Class Kenneth Aaron Smith, 22, from New Jersey.

The collision early Monday morning local time tore a hole in the ship’s port side hull, flooding crew sleeping quarters, and machinery and communications rooms. Five sailors were injured in the accident.

The incident remains under investigation.

It follows a collision similar in nature on June 17, when the guided-missile destroyer USS Fitzgerald collided with a Philippine-flagged container ship southwest of Yokosuka, Japan, tearing a hole in its starboard side and killing seven sailors.

The Navy this week removed the head of the 7th Fleet, which oversees both ships, from command. The Navy also launched an a comprehensive review of the training, certifications and operations of Naval forces in the Pacific and an operational pause for each of the Navy’s six active fleets to review any actions that can be taken to immediately improve safety.

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