Latest Brexit push struggles to gain support

Latest Brexit push struggles to gain support

By Luke Vargas   
Published
Prime Minister Theresa May attends a session of the House of Commons. January 30, 2019. Courtesy: Jessica Taylor/UK Parliament
Prime Minister Theresa May attends a session of the House of Commons. January 30, 2019. Courtesy: Jessica Taylor/UK Parliament

A new Brexit deal unveiled by Prime Minister Theresa May this week is encountering stiff opposition in the House of Commons.

NEW YORK – British Prime Minister Theresa May’s latest push to deliver Brexit faltered on Wednesday as politicians across parliament voiced frustration with a new Brexit deal they say is little different from those rejected multiple times earlier this year.

In remarks to the House of Commons, May presented 10 changes to the so-called E.U. divorce bill that she said demonstrated an awareness of past criticisms. Those changes include letting parliament set the terms of Britain’s customs relationship with the E.U. and allowing lawmakers to call for a second referendum if the Brexit process stumbles in the months ahead.

Yet that pitch was drowned out by reports of an intensifying scramble to replace May as prime minister.

In March, May offered to step down once Brexit passed Parliament, but even members of her own cabinet appear to be prioritizing their leadership aspirations ahead of tweaking an unpopular Brexit bill.

May acknowledged Wednesday that a new prime minister will likely replace her soon, but she contended that a leadership shuffle won’t help overcome policy impasse on some of Brexit’s thornier details.

Tim Oliver is a Senior Lecturer at Loughborough University London thinks May could be right.

“There’s not going to be any solution any time soon to the Brexit problems.

Brexit has poisoned British politics in a way that I don’t think many anticipated even in the run-up to the referendum. Lots of people knew that the referendum wouldn’t solve the issue of Europe and British politics. David Cameron called a referendum because he thought it would be cathartic and drain the poison from British politics. It’s done nothing of the sort.”

Unable to secure Brexit by a previous March 29th deadline, May was forced to seek a extension from the E.U. until October 31st. Barring an unlikely legislative breakthrough or a new prime minister able to make compromise great again, even that might not be enough time.

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